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What does Full Body Sensual Massage (FBSM) mean?

A full body sensual massage is a massage that is given to enhance a person’s sexual excitement. It covers the entire body, with the man’s genitalia and the woman’s breasts and vagina as focal points. It can be referred to as mutual masturbation when performed by sexual partners. It can be part of foreplay, after-sex play, and sex therapy.

A full body sensual massage is a legal service in select countries. This includes Thailand, Australia, Romania, Canada, Japan, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom. However, for the rest of the world, it is illegal and may be considered tantamount to prostitution. If one craves for a full body sensual massage, ask one’s sexual partner first, before considering alternative “service providers.”

The most popular services asked for are: massage, foot fetish, lap dancing, prostate massage, role play, sex toys, striptease, and spanking.

Read more:

Backpage Alternatives (over 60 websites that offer escort listings)

How to beat any prostitution sting (10 easy steps to spot-stay ahead of LE)

FBSM Reviews (escort reviews and verified post. No cops, no stings and no bad dates. All post are verified as being honest and reputable.)

What Is a Tantra Massage?

By Lynette Hingle

Tantra massage is a type of massage that uses sexual energy to achieve a higher state of consciousness. Skilled tantra massage therapists, or lovers who study the art, use specific sensual touches such as lightly running fingertips along the entire body to awaken a dormant energy field within the body. When awakened, this energy field is believed to unite lovers in an ecstatic experience and allow trapped physical and mental pain to escape from the body. Choose a professional tantra therapist who has a solid, professional reputation to teach you and your partner the correct way to perform tantra massage on one another to fully experience the benefits of this ancient healing art.

Tantra, from the Sanskrit root word tan, translates to expand, manifest, show or put forth. Tantra massage sets out to unwrinkle blocked energy throughout the body and awaken the Kundalini, a mythological energy that lies in rest at the base of the spine. When the Kundalini rises from its restful state, it spreads out along the spine and precipitates healing throughout the body.

METHODOLOGY: No two tantra massages are alike. The goal of the tantra massage therapist is to awaken the seven chakras, or energy centers, along the spine of the body in an effort to nudge the sleeping Kundalini from its rest. The tantra massage therapist may begin the session with relaxation methods and move along into centralized chakra energy building techniques, then accelerate into personalized Kundalini arousal techniques.

Sexual arousal is a major emotional impact of tantra massage. Giving and receiving tantra massages is intimate and is often carried out only between lovers who are comfortable with each other, says Anna Lynn Sibal on MassageDen.com. Therefore, professional massage therapists caution clients to alert therapists to change healing methods when any discomfort arises.

BENEFITS: Like other forms of massage, tantra massage can be very relaxing. Tantra massage can also alleviate physical pain and emotional fear and guilt. Tantra massage can also help people to become more fulfilled and personally empowered, says Nik Douglas, producer, writer and director of the 1969 film, “Tantra: Indian Rites of Ecstasy.” Douglas states that by stimulating inherent sensual spirituality through tantra massage, people can awaken parts of themselves that have remained repressed or “asleep.”

BREATHING: Tantra massage is greatly enhanced by the utilization of tantra breathing techniques throughout the massage. These breathing techniques, called pranayamas, allow the recipient to actively move energy from one part of the body to other parts of the body, a feat that enhances the experience and helps the recipient exercise self-discipline and self-control during unanticipated arousal.

Lynette Hingle has been a writer since 2007. She specializes in topics related to health, fitness and travel. Hingle holds a Bachelor of Arts in mass communication and journalism from Southeastern Louisiana University.

Massage: uses touch through rubbing or kneading of parts of the body to aid circulation, relax the muscles, or provide sensual stimulation.

Massage is one of the oldest, simplest forms of therapy. The basic goal of massage therapy is to help the body heal itself and to increase health and well-being.

Read more: First Timers: What to Expect From Your Encounter With an Escort

Backpage Alternatives (over 60 websites that offer escort listings)

How to beat any prostitution sting (10 easy steps to spot-stay ahead of LE)

FBSM Reviews (escort reviews and verified post. No cops, no stings and no bad dates. All post are verified.)

Sneak peak inside FBSM Reviews

If you are just finding us for the first time, FBSM Reviews is where adults go to have fun and be safe from the games and the drama that people play.

At FBSM Reviews, each and every post/review is verified before it is published.

What does that mean for you?  It means that every photo is current and accurate. Every post is a real person. And at FBSM Reviews we take it another step. At FBSM Reviews we only post providers who have a record of being honest and reputable.

Let that sink in for a minute. At FBSM Reviews, you will only find the best providers in the business. Our providers offer a wide range of services from escorting to travel companions, see each post for details.

But what does FBSM Reviews do when we verify a provider is not reputable or honest? FBSM Reviews post that provider with a “SCAM ALERT” attached to their post.

Recently added:

Brielle Devonshire Albuquerque, NM. (Tours: Santa Fe, NM.)

Jade Nikole Norcross, GA.

Carissa Kartel Atlanta, GA.

Lady Malibu Cleveland, OH.

TS Kristi LaCroix Austin, TX.

Nadia Austin, TX.

Leah Luxe San Francisco, CA.

Misa Denver, CO.

Charizma Naples, Fort Lauderdale, Miami, FL. (Tours: Zurich, Switzerland, L.A.., San Diego, CA.)

Madison Montgomery San Diego, CA. (Tours: New York NY., Denver, CO., Austin, TX., L.A., CA.)

Kamilla Loreto Los Angeles, CA. (Tours: San Francisco, San Jose, CA., Seattle, WA., Honolulu, HI.)

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Happy holidays from FBSM Reviews

If you are just finding us for the first time, FBSM Reviews is where adults go to have fun and be safe from the games and the drama that people play.

At FBSM Reviews, each and every post/review is verified before it is published.

What does that mean for you?  It means that every photo is current and accurate. Every post is a real person. And at FBSM Reviews we take it another step. At FBSM Reviews we only post providers who have a record of being honest and reputable.

Let that sink in for a minute. At FBSM Reviews, you will only find the best providers in the business. Our providers offer a wide range of services from escorting to travel companions, see each post for details.

But what does FBSM Reviews do when we verify a provider is not reputable or honest? FBSM Reviews post that provider with a “SCAM ALERT” attached to their post.

Recently added:

Mandy Montana Butte, MO. (Tours: Missoula, Bozeman, Great Falls, Helena, Kalispell, MO)

Danielle Reid Bentonville, Fayetteville, Little Rock, AR.

Vanessa Lovee Santa Barbara, Santa Maria, Los Alamos, CA. (Tours: OC., CA.)

Holly Davis Las Vegas, NV.

Chloe Belle Nashville, TN. (On tour: Little Rock, AR., Fort Worth, Dallas TX., Memphis, TN.)

Porn star Janey New York, NY. (I’m based in Brooklyn but I travel to Manhattan and Queens.)

Alexis Portland, OR. (Beaverton/Hillsboro)

Nicole Chambers Cleveland, OH.

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Congress Ramps Up War on Sex Workers and Their Customers With Secret Votes on Four New ‘Protection’ Laws

By Elizabeth Nolan Brown, Reason

While seemingly preoccupied this week with criminal justice reform and avoiding a government shutdown, Congress also authorized a national strategy for arresting sex buyers and approved the use of secret wiretaps in misdemeanor prostitution cases.

The national plan to “end demand” for prostitution was part of the massive “Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection Reauthorization Act,” which cleared the Senate Monday through a secret vote of the sort civil libertarians have long opposed.

Congress is now “strengthening federal efforts” to be tough on sex buyers, based on the false idea that customers of consenting adult sex workers drive demand for minors. All state and local cops, prosecutors, and judges are to be trained on “best practices for prosecuting buyers” of sex and how to use asset forfeiture in these cases. A federal working group on the study of sex-buyer arrests will also be created, and grants related to human trafficking must include language encouraging those working on demand-reduction efforts to apply.

In addition, Congress “clarif[ies] that commercial sexual exploitation is a form of gender-based violence,” whatever that means.

“Any comprehensive approach to eliminating sex and labor trafficking must include a demand reduction component,” states the bill, which passed the Senate Tuesday after clearing the House in July 2017.

The House also passed the bill via “voice vote,” a process under which there’s neither a record of how members voted, whether they were present for a vote, nor how many total members actually voted. Voice votes—also known as unanimous consent agreements—can be contested by a member demanding a regular vote. This week, Rep. Thomas Massie (R-Ky.) has been demanding recorded votes on a slew of measures in the House.

Meanwhile, in the Senate, Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R–Ky.) was using the process to usher through four bills at the intersection of law enforcement, human rights, bureaucracy building, and foreign diplomacy. In addition to the Frederick Douglass Act (H.R. 2200, with no separate Senate version), the following bills also passed the Senate by unanimous consent on Monday:

The chambers are now resolving differences on all three before sending them to President Donald Trump for signing. The total package includes a mixed bag of policies and funding priorities.

FINE PRINT

Tucked in some tiny sections are significant changes, some that go way beyond human trafficking. For instance, a section of S. 1311 would allow state law enforcement to use secret wiretaps on sex workers and their customers.

A part of S.1312 “amends the federal criminal code to broaden the authority of the U.S. Secret Service to provide forensic and investigative assistance to state and local law enforcement agencies by allowing assistance in support of any investigation—not just an investigation involving missing or exploited children.” [Emphasis mine]

Another “amends the federal criminal code to authorize the Department of Justice (DOJ) to bring a civil action to stop or prevent criminal offenses related to suspected forced labor, sex trafficking, or sexual abuse.” This would give the DOJ more leeway to preemptively shut down businesses while building a criminal case.

One provision essentially creates a new federal crime initiative by directing resources and money to fight “sextortion.” Among other (expanded) missions, the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children will now teach school kids, cops, and staff about the dangers of “sexting and sextortion,” too.

The measures include grant money for new programs aimed at school resource officers, teachers, and students that purportedly teach the signs of sex trafficking.

And they set aside more money for Customs and Border Protection “to expand outreach and live on-site anti-trafficking training for airport and airline personnel”—efforts that have thus far yielded a host of high-profile stories about profiling interracial families and not a single confirmed story involving actual sex traffickers.

On average, however, there’s actually less sex-trafficking panic in these bills than similar measures we’ve been seeing this century, with way fewer references to inflated and debunked statistics. The End Demand element notwithstanding, there’s also less conflation of sex work that adults freely engage in and forced prostitution of adults or minors.

Congress instructs the Justice Department to develop better training with regard to “limiting arrests or prosecutions of trafficking victims for crimes they commit as a direct result” of being victimized, and to award grants to groups that prioritize this approach.

Senators also rejected the part of a House-approved measure that required traveling federal employees to stay at hotels “with certain policies relating to child sexual exploitation.”

In addition, a host of transparency-related provisions are potentially good.

For nearly two decades, the feds have been leading and supporting anti-human-trafficking efforts with little accounting for the money and time spent or the results. Now, Congress is instructing DOJ to report on the methodology it uses “to assess the prevalence of human trafficking.” In addition, federal crime reports are instructed to start measuring instances of child-labor violations, assisting or promoting prostitution arrests, and solicitation for commercial sex arrests.

Congress tells the FBI to “publish a status report on the Innocence Lost National Initiative,” a nationwide effort, coordinated with local police, that has operated largely in secret for more than a decade. It’s the initiative behind the FBI’s annual Operation Cross Country, which I have written about in detail. The data Congress requested is information my former colleague Lauren Krisai and I have sought to get from the FBI, with no luck.

Congress also tells the government-funded-but-FOIA-exempt National Center for Missing and Exploited Children “to make publicly available the annual report on missing children and the incidence of attempted child abductions.”

And it asks for more accountability from Homeland Security Investigations (HSI) about trafficking-related investigations. HSI is involved in all sorts of prostitution stings around America, especially ones involving Asian massage parlors.

A large part of the legislation is concerned with the State Department’s annual Trafficking in Persons report, which places countries into one of three tiers based on how well we think they’re doing to counter sex and labor trafficking. Bad rankings on this list can affect a country’s business dealings, reputation, and eligibility for various U.S. programs. Historically, the TIP report has been used as a political tool and is ripe for abuse. In the new legislation, Congress offers more guidelines for placing countries in which tier, how they’re moved between them, and what counts as “credible information” for purposes of determining their rank.

Overall, there’s a lot of overlapping instruction and redundancy in the four bills approved in the Senate Monday. Perhaps they could have benefited from full attention by the legislature instead of McConnell rushing them through under secret votes right before a holiday break.

But the fact that he was able to do that underscores something interesting. For at least a decade, lawmakers have made a big deal about introducing, supporting, and passing bills related to sex trafficking. Interestingly, there was little fanfare from folks in Congress about the passage of these measures. It seems that when these efforts aren’t full of sex panic and high-profile targets like Backpage, there’s little glory in claiming credit for them.

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Happy holidays from FBSM Reviews

If you are just finding us for the first time, FBSM Reviews is where adults go to have fun and be safe from the games and the drama that people play.

At FBSM Reviews, each and every post/review is verified before it is published.

What does that mean for you?  It means that every photo is current and accurate. Every post is a real person. And at FBSM Reviews we take it another step. At FBSM Reviews we only post providers who have a record of being honest and reputable.

Let that sink in for a minute. At FBSM Reviews, you will only find the best providers in the business. Our providers offer a wide range of services from escorting to travel companions, see each post for details.

But what does FBSM Reviews do when we verify a provider is not reputable or honest? FBSM Reviews post that provider with a “SCAM ALERT” attached to their post.

Recently added:

Jessica Peruvian New York, NY. (Tours: Midtown, Elmhurst, Manhattan, NY.)

Sexi Lexi Billings, MO.

Ms Terri Slidell/New Orleans, LA. (Tours: Hattiesburg, Jackson, MI.)

Sunny Hattiesburg, MS.

Katherine Washington, DC. (Tours: Fairfax, VA.)

Classy Carolina San Jose, CA.

Lauren New York, NY. (Tours: Manhattan, NY.)

Aquarius Dallas, TX. (Richardson, Plano)

Want more? Recently added 12/13 (NSFW)

Free tour (NSFW)

If you are just finding us for the first time, FBSM Reviews is where adults go to have fun and be safe from the games and the drama that people play.

At FBSM Reviews, each and every post/review is verified before it is published.

What does that mean for you?  It means that every photo is current and accurate. Every post is a real person. And at FBSM Reviews we take it another step. At FBSM Reviews we only post providers who have a record of being honest and reputable.

Let that sink in for a minute. At FBSM Reviews, you will only find the best providers in the business. Our providers offer a wide range of services from escorting to travel companions, see each post for details.

But what does FBSM Reviews do when we verify a provider is not reputable or honest? FBSM Reviews post that provider with a “SCAM ALERT” attached to their post.

Recently added:

Athena Marie Redding, CA. (Tours: Sacramento, Santa Cruz, Monterey, CA.)

Katy Fremont, CA. (Tours: Santa Rosa, Sacramento, Anaheim, Pomona, Orange, CA.)

Jasmine Flowers Honolulu, HI. (Tours: Oahu, Waikiki, Maui, HI., Oakland, OC, San Francisco, CA., Houston, TX., Atlanta, GA.)

London Rose Las Vegas, NV. (On tour: Oklahoma City, Tulsa, OK. Wichita, KS., Phoenix, AZ., Salt Lake City, UT., Albuquerque, NM., Colorado Springs, CO.)

Doll face the queen Albuquerque, NM. (Tours: Sacramento, Santa Cruz, San Jose, Stockton, Daly City, CA., Wichita, KS., Denver, CO.)

Miss Mandi Mason Albuquerque, NM. (Tours: Denver, CO.)

Catherine Forrest New York, NY. (Tours: Manhattan, NY.)

Winter Kay Oklahoma City, OK. (Tours: Denver, CO., Dallas, Austin, San Antonio, TX., Kansas City, St. Louis, MO., Chicago, IL., Nashville, TN.)

SCAM ALERT: Ashley Banks San Francisco, CA. (Tours: San Jose, East Bay, Fairfield, Pleasant Hill, CA.)

Koi Erotica Seattle, WA. (On tour: Portland, OR.)

Katy Fremont, CA. (Tours: Santa Rosa, Sacramento, Anaheim, Pomona, Orange, CA.)

Kitty Kouture Baton Rogue, LA. (Tours: Lafayette, Nola, New Orleans)

Lisa Charms Las Vegas, NV. (Tours: Chicago, IL.)

Bailey Boston, MA. (Tours: Seattle, WA. San Francisco, CA. Manhattan, NY.)

Josie Viper Walnut Creek, CA. (Tours: San Francisco, Tahoe, San Rafael, CA.)

Zada Tampa, FL. (On tour: Miami, FL., Orlando, FL., LA, CA., Naples)

Scarlett Syn Renton, WA. (Seattle)

The rise of fake Amazon reviews — and how to spot them

By David Pogue

Customer reviews were supposed to be one of the internet’s greatest breakthroughs. They let you know if a product was any good before you spent money on it. Sites like Amazon, Yelp, TripAdvisor, Uber, Lyft, and Airbnb built their successes on the trust created by those review systems.

But these days, that trust is getting shaky.

How bad is the problem?

Here’s the thing: The review system is essential to trust — and to Amazon’s business model. After all, if you’re an online-only store, your customers can’t touch and examine your wares. All they have to go on are reviews from other customers.

But here’s the other thing: If you’re a desperate, obscure company, those reviews are your only hope of generating sales. Highly rated products appear first in Amazon’s search results, so getting your product listed at the top means big money. Gaming the system becomes very appealing.

“Anyone with a brain can see that there are a lot of problems,” says Saoud Khalifah founder of FakeSpot.com. (FakeSpot is a site whose algorithms help you weed out fake reviews from Amazon — or Yelp, or TripAdvisor, or the Apple app store; more on this below.)

“I would estimate right now, across all categories, around 30% are fake reviews,” Khalifah says. “Of the Chinese no-name companies, I’d say 95% of them are fake reviews.”

For its part, Amazon says that figure is overblown. “Inauthentic reviews made up less than 1% of all reviews on Amazon last month,” a spokesperson told me by email.

But as Tommy Noonan, creator of another fake-review-spotting site called ReviewMeta, points out, that there are millions of reviews on Amazon. So if 1% of 200 million reviews are fake, he noted, “there are still 2 million fake reviews on Amazon.”

Besides, Noonan says, “How do they know there are 1% fake reviews? I mean, if they know a review is fake, they’re gonna delete it, right? It’s basically impossible for anybody to say what percentage are fake.”

Where fake reviews come from

Just how sneaky are those sellers? Here are some of their tactics:

  • The 100%-off coupon. In Facebook groups, the sellers offer you a juicy deal: Buy their product and leave it a five-star review. In exchange, you’ll get a coupon good for the entire purchase price, or even more. This way, your review will still say “Verified Purchase” (Amazon’s badge that indicates you genuinely bought the product from Amazon). “It’s almost impossible for Amazon to track — and they’re giving these reviews the Verified Purchase badge,” says Noonan. “It’s not some guy in Bangladesh sitting at a computer writing thousands of reviews a day, but it’s still misleading to the consumer.”
  • The bot armies. Sleazy sellers can buy blocks of fake Amazon customer accounts by the thousand. Then they use people or software bots to write fake five-star reviews for their own products. (They’re careful to make subtle changes to each review — varying the number of exclamation points, for example — so that Amazon’s algorithms won’t spot the duplicates.)
  • The bait-and-switch. Once a seller has earned a high rating for a product, he can swap in a different photo and description, and voila: Instant high ratings for a completely unrelated product. Check out the page for this flash drive, for example, where (at this writing, anyway), the various reviews refer to a paper calendar, a blanket, a tooth-pain medicine, and binoculars. This seller has switched its product on this page, in other words, multiple times.
  • The praise-your-enemies trick. Sometimes, sellers leave crude, obviously phony five-star reviews for competitors’ products. These reviews are engineered to trigger Amazon’s own algorithms, so that their competitors get suspended. (Alternatively, they click the “Helpful” button on negative reviews for rival products, so that those reviews rise to the top.)
  • Amazon, in an effort to foster growth, has been inviting more Chinese companies (and U.S. sellers selling Chinese goods) to list their wares on the company’s site. (Only about half of the items listed on Amazon are actually sold by Amazon. All the rest are shipped directly to you from “third-party sellers,” who may use Amazon packaging to make it feel more Amazon-ish.) As you can guess, that trend makes the fake-reviews problem even worse.

All right. Now you know what you’re up against. But you have some tactics at your disposal, too. Here are a few ways to tell fake reviews from good ones:

  • Check the reviewer’s profile. When you click a reviewer’s name (which appears above every review), you get to see her profile page, which is often extremely enlightening. It shows all of this person’s reviews, for all products, all clumped together. If it looks like they’re all on the same day (or couple of days), or if they’re all variations of the same comments, you should smell a rat.
  • Look at the three- and four-star reviews. One aspect of a fake review you can count on: It’ll be a five-star review. (Or, when a seller is trying to attack a competitor, a one-star review.) A two-, three-, or four-star rating doesn’t accomplish much in moving a review’s search-results position. Therefore, the in-between ratings are more likely to be authentic — and therefore worth reading.
  • Watch out for one-worders. The name of the game is the star rating; the higher the average rating, the higher the product appears in Amazon’s search results. Therefore, fake reviews are often very short and non-specific (“Great!!”), because the actual prose of the review doesn’t affect its attractiveness to Amazon’s search algorithms.
  • Watch out for compensated reviews. Until October 2016, you were allowed to post a review you’d written in exchange for free stuff, as long as you revealed that you’d gotten a gift. It quickly became clear, though, that those reviewers were far more likely to leave positive reviews (shocker!) — and in October 2016, Amazon barred the practice. Those older reviews are still hanging around, though.
  • Beware the Vine. Incredibly, Amazon itself encourages a similar sort of compensated review to this day, in the form of Amazon Vine. That’s a program that sends you free products in exchange for reviews. You have to be invited to become a Vine reviewer (based on your history of leaving well-regarded reviews), and sellers have no direct contact with you. Still, it seems rife with bias. Sellers pay Amazon for the reviews (from $2,000 to $7,500, according to Khalifah), and send the free products for Amazon to pass along to the Vine reviewers. As noted above, it’s human nature to give a higher rating to something you got for free. At least Vine reviews are clearly marked.
  • Check the wish list. “You don’t even need to look at the reviews,” says FakeSpot’s Khalifah. “Look at the wish list! Nobody ever looks at the wish list.” At the left side of a seller’s profile page, you can click one of his Wish Lists. If you see the same items over and over again, even though you’re inspecting different reviewers’ profiles, you’ve found a cheat.

Trust older reviews. The widespread gaming of Amazon reviews is a relatively recent phenomenon. “Any review before 2013, you could put a lot of trust in,” says Khalifah. (The exception, of course, is if you spot an old review that describes a completely different product. In that case, the seller has swapped in a different product.)

Obviously, that list of traits that characterize good and bad reviews entails a lot of work on your part, especially if a product has hundreds of reviews. You’d be wise, therefore, to paste the page’s link into FakeSpot or ReviewMeta. These sites check out all of the reviews for the product at once.

“There are so many angles, so many variables,” says FakeSpot’s Khalifah. “We take a look at all the reviews for the product. Then we look at the all the reviewers themselves, all their historic reviews, all their wish lists, and try to find any patterns.”

FakeSpot shows you how many of the reviews it suspects are bogus, and clearly explains its reasoning. ReviewMeta actually recalculates the Amazon star rating for you, based only on the reviews it suspects to be valid.

Each site offers a web-browser extension (plug-in), so that you don’t even have to do the copy-and-paste thing. (FakeSpot’s extension is currently $2 a month, but Khalifah says that it will be free soon.)

What’s Amazon doing?

The fake-review problem is getting worse; Amazon says that it’s up for the challenge. “We know the value of reviews for customers, and even one inauthentic review is unacceptable,” the spokesperson told me. “Customers can report suspicious reviews 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and we investigate each claim. We take forceful action against both reviewers and sellers by suppressing reviews that violate our guidelines, and [we] suspend, ban, or pursue legal action against these bad actors.”

The company bans sellers and fake-review accounts by the thousands; each time, it uses machine learning to improve and anticipate the sellers’ ever-evolving tactics. Amazon also works with Facebook to shut down those “free stuff for five-star review” groups, and has filed over a thousand lawsuits against sellers and fake reviewers.

Both Khalifah and Noonan say that they can see Amazon’s efforts at work. “My data does show that Amazon is deleting tons of reviews — literally millions of reviews,” says ReviewMeta’s Tommy Noonan.

But it’s an arms race, a cat-and-mouse game, and it’s not clear that the good guys are winning. Amazon and other review-based companies are increasingly fighting the same kinds of trust battles that are hobbling every aspect of the internet these days. It’s no longer enough to be a good judge of value and quality when you shop; now, you’re expected to be a good judge of the reviews that are supposed to guide you.

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